Mnamon

Ancient writing systems in the Mediterranean

A critical guide to electronic resources

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    2020-07-06

    Book

    700 Skarabäen und Verwandtes aus Palästina/Israel Othmar Keel, Orbis Biblicus et Orientalis. Series Archaeologica, 39, Peeters 2020.

    The scarabs and related seal amulets published here form a collection that was assembled between 1975 and 2012 during work on the author’s Corpus of stamp-seal amulets from Palestine/Israel. The aim was to prevent numerous unusual and interesting pieces disappearing from view in unpublished private collections or as items of jewellery, and to guarantee researchers and the public continuing access to them. The 700 pieces were selected in such a way that the most significant groups and motifs that were produced in or imported into Canaan/Palestine are represented and, collectively, form a kind of textbook on the subject. In that respect, the collection and this catalogue are both unique.
    (D.Tripaldi)
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    2020-07-06

    Book

    A History of the Kingdom of Jerusalem and Judah Edward Lipinski, Orientalia Lovaniensia Analecta, 287, Peeters,2020

    This history of the Kingdom of Jerusalem and Judah is quite different from the usual narratives of biblical history. It parallels the same author’s History of the Kingdom of Israel (OLA 275) and is mainly based on information provided by epigraphic sources dating from the 19th/18th century B.C. on, when Jerusalem and its rulers are first mentioned. The book is divided in seven chapters. The first one deals with the proto-history of Jerusalem in Bronze Age and Iron Age I. The second one concerns the Davidic dynasty whose lineage is followed until the mid-ninth century. Chapters III and IV continue the history of the kingdom until the destruction of Jerusalem by Babylonians in 587. After ca. 800 B.C. the name of the kingdom was changed from Beth David in Judah following internal dynastic problems. Chapter V examines some questions concerning religion in Jerusalem and Judah, especially the alleged "sacred prostitution" and the "molk-sacrifices". Chapter VI discusses the special case of the relations between the Yahwistic sanctuary of Bethel, annexed to Judah by king Josiah, and the theonym Bethel, attested in Jewish-Aramaean ambiences of the Persian period. Chapter VII deals with burial customs and the conception of the netherworld or Sheol, mainly from the monarchic period on.
    (D.Tripaldi)
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    2020-04-30

    Book

    Burton MacDonald A History of Ancient Moab from the Ninth to First Centuries BCE, SBL Press, Atlanta, 2020, 304 pp.


    Recent overview of our literary and epigraphic knowledge on Moab, its language and culture till the Babylonian age.
    (D.Tripaldi)

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    2020-04-21

    Top ten list of 2019 most important archaeological discoveries in Israel

    Between March and April 2019, three short seal impressions in paleo-Hebrew writing were unearthed in Jerusalem. They date back to 8th-7th centuries BC. First images, a brief comment on the inscriptions and further links provided in the article.
    https://www.timesofisrael.com/digging-the-land-the-top-10-holy-land-archaeology-stories-of-2019/
    (D.Tripaldi)
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    2020-02-03

    Book

    The Pylos Tablets Transcribed. Deuxième édition, par Jean-Pierre Olivier et Maurizio Del Freo, Padova, Libreriauniversitaria.it edizioni, 2020, XX + 388 pp., ISBN 978-88-3359-205-3.


    This book contains the second edition of the Linear B tablets from Pylos. The transcriptions are based on those contained in The Pylos Tablets Transcribed, Rome 1973-1976, by E. L. Bennett, jr. and J.-P. Olivier, as well as on a series of contributions with new texts, joins and readings published between 1992 and 2017. This new edition aims not only at providing Linear B scholars with an updated working tool, but also at offering a critical contribution to those who are engaged in the production of the Pylos corpus, the ultimate goal of a complex editorial work, which has seen the collaboration of many specialists over the last decades. The work is dedicated to the memory of the pioneer of the Pylian epigraphy, E. L. Bennett, jr.